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GOOD GIRL/ BAD GIRL
HEY WORLD, HERE I AM – THE STREISAND STORY
FINGERPRINTS
FOLLOW THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD – A MUSICAL JOURNEY WITH HAROLD ARLEN
THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS: THE MUSICAL!

GOOD GIRL/ BAD GIRL

MAUREEN COONEY
PRODUCER: THE MUSIC SHOW, RADIO NATIONAL

The moment Avigail Herman steps on stage, she connects. Her Jody is engaging, funny and convincing – and when she sings! Every song is an experience, delivered in fine voice and with the emotional range that distinguishes an artist at the top of her game.
Full review
STEPHEN SNELLEMAN
INDEPENDENT MUSIC PRODUCER

The singing is gloriously effortless – technique never gets in the way and the songs are simply an extension of the character. And what songs! I didn’t know many but these are all gems – with wonderful arrangements that make the pianist an expressive partner, not just a support.
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DENNIS SMITH
PRODUCER: GUYS & DOLLS, DUSTY THE MUSICAL

Congratulations on your show… It is a most interesting concept and works extremely well. You totally immersed yourself in the character of Jody making the whole experience for the audience believable. And I loved the songs. A great selection.
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AUSSIETHEATRE.COM
‘She sings flawlessly… with an ease that’s both startling and endearing.’
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JO LITSON
ARTS EDITOR SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

Herman is singing beautifully, still floating her soaring top notes with effortless ease and really connecting emotionally with the lyrics.
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HEY WORLD, HERE I AM – THE STREISAND STORY

PETER WILKINS
THE CANBERRA TIMES 

Sheer chutzpah! That's the amazing power and range of the voice of chanteuse Avigail Herman in her tribute to the legendary Barbra Streisand in Hey World, Here I am. The Streisand Story. Even the great diva herself would marvel at Herman's stunning salute. Accompanied by the perfectly attuned Peter Bailey on piano, vocals and guitar, Herman's regrettably all too brief cabaret act traverses almost half a century of Streisand hits, from Cole Porter's lesser known Come to the Supermarket in Old Peking to the iconic Don't Rain On My Parade and the superbly soulful rendition of Papa, Can You Hear Me from Yentl.
Full review
KATE BOSTON-SMITH
THEATRE PRESS

Performing in a difficult space, Herman opens her heart through the songs of Barbra Streisand to her audience. Herman is a true professional in every sense of the word. This show is classic and sleek and Herman is as intelligent as she is talented.
Full review
JOHN SHAND
THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD

Herman is an accomplished actress and natural comedian, who sparkled all the more as she moved deeper into the show. While she especially relished the wacky Minute Waltz and the goofy Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf ?, she could also attack a song like Sondheim's Everybody Says Don't with shrewdly weighted emphases, and pledge her soul to a compelling Papa Can You Hear Me ?
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PATRICK MCDONALD
THE ADELAIDE ADVERTISER

Herman doesn't pretend to be Babs between songs, although her face and frizzy hair certainly bear more than a passing resemblance to the diva, circa mid-70's. Instead she delivers occasionally humorous facts about Streisand as cues into hits from Broadway (Second Hand Rose, Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf, Come to the Supermarket), the movies (The Way We Were, Evergreen, Yentl's Papa Can You Hear Me?) and pop charts (You Don't Bring Me Flowers) ably backed by Peter Bailey on the piano, guitar and vocals.
Full review
PETER MORRISON
THE AUSTRALIAN JEWISH NEWS

Actor/singer Avigail Herman is different. In this Streisand show, she does the impossible, not merely evoking the hugely talented and versatile superstar, but coming close to matching the great Ms S.
Herman has so much talent and such a towering technique that she shines and bursts forth as a star in her own right, by no means a pale reflection of Streisand.

Full review
JULIE MOFFATT
MANLY DAILY

Herman's stage presence is commanding, with her blend of gentle wit, intimate storytelling technique and powerful rendition of the multiplicity of songs, holding her audience until beyond her encore.
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W. L. HOFFMAN
THE CANBERRA TIMES

Avigail Herman is one of this country's most accomplished musical theatre and cabaret performers, and this fine presentation which she brought to the National Press Club Cabaret last Saturday night was one of the highlights of the Adelaide Cabaret Festival.

While there are some distinct physical as well as vocal resemblances with Barbra Streisand, the show is in no way a mere impersonation of the great artist of popular music.

Full review

FINGERPRINTS

DAMIAN MADDEN
STAGENOISE.COM

As well as being a performer Avigail is also one of the country’s most respected teachers of musical theatre. While watching her perform you can tell that the next generation of performers are in good hands. Avigail has an amazing ability to interpret a song, turning it inside out and discovering the inner meaning, allowing her to really sell it. Her transformation from song to song is quite remarkable and she makes you believe that the song she is singing was really written for or about her and her life.
Full review
BRAD SYKE
SYDNEY STAGE ONLINE

Last night was the world premiere of Fingerprints and it was a privilege to be there. The show honours the professionalism, research, thoughtfulness, insight and intelligence Avigail Herman brings to bear, as a matter of course. While others might be content to loosely sew together a series of songs with a thread of plastic patter, romanticised rhetoric or bullshitful biography, the redoubtable Herman's sincerity is undeniable; everything she does is authentically related to her life.
Full review

FOLLOW THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD – A MUSICAL JOURNEY WITH HAROLD ARLEN

EWART SHAW
ADELAIDE ADVERTISER

Harold Arlen wrote lots of songs that no one knows are his creations. That's the story from Avigail Herman as she leads her audience along the Yellow Brick Road. She's evangelical in her fervour to bring the man's undoubted genius to public attention.

She accentuates his positives, eliminates boredom and come rain or come shine intends to see her listeners have a good time. Her voice is powerful, with an effective range of colour and she shows it off energetically.

Full review

THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS: THE MUSICAL!

DIANNA SIMMONDS
STAGENOISE.COM.AU

LAUGHTER is the best medicine, according to Reader's Digest, so it must be true. And if you're feeling even slightly crook then you really have to get yourself along to the Parade Theatres for a dose of great medicine. Although be aware that it's likely you'll laugh so much you might snap a rib, accidentally kick another patron in the back of the neck or, at the very least, leave with that kind of aching face that comes from chortling non-stop for about two hours. And all through the guts and effort of yet another new independent company: Triptych aka Avigail Herman and Jane Miskovic.
Full review
MAZ DICKSON
AUSSIETHEATRE.COM.AU

Top marks also to sound and lighting designers Felix Kulakowski and Matthew Tunchon, choreographer Jane Miskovic (who also co-directs with Herman) and accomplished accompanist Nigel Ubrihien. Cast and crew manage to give a big-show feel to a small production, and pull five very different mini-musicals into a single cohesive show. To be honest, I wasn’t expecting much from a show called The Musical of Musicals: The Musical! but this little show puts many larger productions to shame.
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NEIL LITCHFIELD
STAGEWHISPERS.COM.AU

Performed on a bare stage, in basic black costumes with simple, clever props and accessories, a few chairs and a suitably minimalised staircase, everything is thrown back on the talent, versatility and broad musical theatre vocabulary of the four terrific performers: Avigail Herman, Andrew Bevis, Belinda Wollaston and Warwick Allsopp. They come up trumps, pushing the fun to its over-the-top limit, and nailing the appropriate style for each mini-musical. Though most are singers rather than dancers, their ‘faking’ feels spot on.
Full review
DARRYN KING
DRUM MEDIA

Some parodies require you to be intimately familiar with what’s being parodied - while others are so dippy and fun that they’re enjoyable for neophytes. The Musical of Musicals (The Musical!) swings between celebration and spoof with reckless abandon, a rollicking entertainment which strongly rewards a love of musical theatre but - go figure – will also be a heck of a good time for people who don’t care for the form at all.
Full review
LEANNE CROKER
THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

The number of song and dance productions doing the rounds certainly seems to support the theory that everyone loves a musical. They are usually a good bet to strike a chord with audiences, especially if they are filled with familiar tunes. But what if, as in this Triptych Theatre production, you could offer five musicals wrapped into one?
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